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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.Then, one by one, they began to be killed off. One Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, watched as her family was murdered. Her older sister was shot. Her mother was then slowly poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances.In this last remnant of the Wild Westwhere oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes such as Al Spencer, the Phantom Terror, roamed virtually anyone who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll surpassed more than twenty-four Osage, the newly created F.B.I. took up the case, in what became one of the organizations first major homicide investigations. But the bureau was then notoriously corrupt and initially bungled the case. Eventually the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to try to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only Native American agents in the bureau. They infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest modern techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most sinister conspiracies in American history.A true-life murder mystery about one of the most monstrous crimes in American history....

Title : Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
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ISBN : 9780385534253
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 359 pages
Url Type : Home » Killers » Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Start by marking Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI as Want to Read Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Read an Excerpt Chapter The Vanishing In April, millions of tiny flowers spread over the blackjack hills and vast prairies in the Osage territory of Oklahoma. Summary Killers of the Flower Moon Summarized for Busy Summary Killers of the Flower Moon Summarized for Busy People The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Based on the Customer reviews Killers of the Flower Moon Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI at Read honest and unbiased Killers of the Flower Moon The Osage Murders and the Informative, Interesting, Insightful, BookMovement s reading guide includes discussion questions, plot summary, reviews and ratings and suggested discussion questions Killers of the Flower Moon The New York Times KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON The Osage Murders and the Birth of the F.B.I By David Grann pp Doubleday . In Book excerpt Killers of the Flower Moon CBS News The Vanishing In April, millions of tiny flowers spread over the blackjack hills and vast prairies in the Osage territory of Oklahoma There are Johnny jump ups and Killers of the Flower Moon USA TODAY Killers of the Flower Moon Subtitle The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI In The s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native And then Osage members started turning up dead In his new book, Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann describes how white people in the area conspired Books David Grann Praise for Killers of the Flower Moon Quite simply, this is a remarkable book, by a remarkable author an exhumation of a shockingly brutal series of historical

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Reviews

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    David Grann, a journalist, has done an excellent job investigating and chronicling the terrible story of the Osage American Indian murders in the 1920s. It's a chilling story - hard to believe it's true, hard to believe people could be so cruel and callous. Hard to believe I've never heard of this before.

    In about 1904, the Osage tribe had negotiated a contract with the U.S. government; tellingly, their lawyer was able to slip in a clause that all oil, gas and other mineral rights on their land w

    "To believe that the Osages survived intact from their ordeal is a delusion of the mind. What has been possible to salvage has been saved and is dearer to our hearts because it survived. What is gone is treasured because it was what we once were. We gather our past and present into the depths of our being and face tomorrow. We are still Osage."
    Initial post: I've borrowed this from a friend for a December book club read. She says it's due back at the library in 5 days. *cracks knuckles* No sweat, right?

    P.S. I read it in just two days - it was that gripping. ...more

  • Matt

    “History is a merciless judge. It lays bare our tragic blunders and foolish missteps and exposes our most intimate secrets, wielding the power of hindsight like an arrogant detective who seems to know the end of the mystery from the outset.”

    - David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon

    David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon is an irresistible combination: part history, part true crime, and part journalistic memoir, it sheds a bright light on a dark corner of our nation’s history, one that has been
    ...more

  • Montzalee Wittmann

    Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann was a difficult book to read because of all the injustice to the Osage people and victims especially. What a horrible stain on our history. I wish it was a compulsory book for high school kids to read and discuss today. Would it make a difference? I don't know but there is so much white-washing in the history books as it is. This was a book for our reading group and I am so glad it was picked or I probably woul ...more

  • Elyse

    Reading about injustice -historical tragedies--such greed - such ugliness---does something to us. It's hard to explain the depths of what transforms.

    We feel the anger... the incredible unfairness. We feel different- changed in ways - after reading a book like this. It's the type of book that makes me want to 'do something'.

    White people cheated Indians out of their land! That we 'knew'.... but there is much in this small book many people are not aware of. Author David Grann kept peeling off the
    ...more

  • Linda

    "We Indians cannot get our rights in these courts and I have no chance at all of saving this land for my children." (Widow of Joe Bates, Osage Nation, 1921)

    No horror novella could possibly mirror the horrendous crimes that were visited upon the Osage Indian Nation in the 1920's. The catastrophic bungling of crime evidence, the leaks and sabotage, and the willful insidious behavior by unscrupulous individuals is mind-boggling. The devil and his cohorts wore well-pressed suits and walked among the
    ...more

  • Esil

    By a complete twist of history, the Osage who were ousted from their own land during the 19th century were relocated to a part of the US that turned out to be a huge source of oil. While the oil brought tremendous prosperity to the Osage, it also brought greedy unscrupulous assassins who decimated and terrified these people with little protection from law enforcement or the courts. I listened to the audio of Killers of the Flower Moon. The three parts are cleverly read by different narrators. Th ...more

  • PorshaJo

    Lies, greed, murder, cover-ups....what a frightful Halloween read. Except this one is a true story, which makes it even more frightening. This is the true story of the Osage Indians. How they were taken advantage of and belittled by everyone. In the early 19th century, they were forced from their lands and eventually ended up taking up residence on Indian territory, which is now known as Oklahoma. Then, in the early 20th century, there was found to be oil on those lands. They had a headright on ...more

  • Mandy

    This book was an interesting, fascinating read. I can honestly say that I had never heard of the Osage murders until I heard about this book, and this book covered everything about the case.

    There are a lot of characters and most of them are introduced quite early on, so at first I was flicking back and forth until I got everyone straight in my head. That is the only negative thing that I can say about this book, and it wasn't long before I sorted who everyone was, so it was only a minor irritat
    ...more